Types of images

Catalyst provides some pre-configured operating system images to make it easier for you to get started on the cloud.

The table below lists the images provided by Catalyst and our partners, as well as the default user name you should use to log in to each one of them (unless you have overwritten the default user name with cloud-init).

Operating system Image name prefix User-name
Atomic Linux atomic-* centos
CentOS Linux centos-* centos
CoreOS Linux coreos-* core
Debian Linux debian-* debian
Fedora Atomic Linux fedora-atomic-* fedora
Ubuntu Linux ubuntu-* ubuntu

Note

The orchestration service (Heat) changes the default user name on compute instances launched by it to “ec2”. This is done to preserve some level of compatibility with AWS CloudFormation.

Our standard policy is not to modify or customise cloud images provided by upstream Linux distributions. This gives you the assurance that you are running software exactly as provided by the software providers.

Before using the images provided by Catalyst, you should always confirm that they are suitable for your needs and fit for purpose. Catalyst provides them “as is”, without warranty of any kind. If there is something you need to change, you can always upload your own images, crafted the way you like, or take a snapshot of ours and modify it the way you need.

How can I identify the images provided by Catalyst?

The images provided by Catalyst are uploaded to projectID (also known as tenant previously) 94b566de52f9423fab80ceee8c0a4a23 and are made public. With the command line tools, you can easily located them by running:

openstack image list --long | grep 94b566de52f9423fab80ceee8c0a4a23

For a less verbose view filter by column name

openstack image list -c ID -c Name -c Project --long | grep 94b566de52f9423fab80ceee8c0a4a23

Images provided by our partners

Operating system User-name Partner
Windows admin Silicon Systems

Before using the images provided by our Partners, you should always confirm that they are suitable for your needs and fit for purpose. Catalyst provides them “as is”, without warranty of any kind.

Creating your own custom images

The OpenStack upstream documentation provides detailed instructions on how to prepare all major operating systems to run in the cloud: https://docs.openstack.org/image-guide/create-images-manually.html

Another method for creating custom images is to use Packer. Packer is an open source tool developed by Hashicorp for creating machine images for multiple platforms from a single source configuration. We have made a tutorial entitled Using Packer to build custom bootable images on the Catalyst Cloud that demonstrates how to use Packer.